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Health Department

Data and Benchmarks


Knox County COVID-19 Data

(Data is updated as of )

These numbers, with the exception of the map, are updated daily at 11 a.m. EDT. State numbers are updated at 2 p.m. CDT daily; there may be a lag in reporting of cumulative numbers at the state level.

Please note, these data are meant to provide a rough estimate of testing volume. Due to different source data, numbers may differ slightly from day to day. This data is subject to change.

Cases:

Click here for more information about the data.

* Recovered refers to released from isolation.

** Information about hospitalization status is gathered at the time of diagnosis, therefore this information may be incomplete. This number indicates the number of Knox County residents that were ever hospitalized during their illness.

*** This figure represents only Knox County residents currently hospitalized at any hospital.

**** Probable cases are those that:
‐ Meet clinical criteria AND epidemiologic evidence with no confirmatory laboratory testing performed for COVID-19
‐ Meet presumptive laboratory evidence AND either clinical criteria OR epidemiologic evidence.

**** Probable cases are included in demographic data.

Gender:

 

Click here for more information about the data.

We became aware that the negative tests that we were posting on our website, gathered from the National Electronic Disease Surveillance System Base System (NBS), may not accurately reflect the number of negative tests in our jurisdiction, as residence isn’t always gathered for negative tests. Because we know testing analysis is critical to determining the burden of disease, we are exploring ways to accurately report negative tests on our website. However, for the time being, we took the chart down to avoid further confusion. For now, we will refer to the statewide testing total on the Tennessee Department of Health’s website.

Historically, negative test results aren’t reported to public health at the local or statewide level. For that reason, there was not a standard system in place, statewide or federally, for the manner in which negative tests are reported. Typically, the burden of infectious disease is evaluated based on positives compared to total population.

* The National Electronic Disease Surveillance System Base System (NBS) is a CDC-developed information system that helps public health departments manage reportable disease data and send data to CDC.

Age Category:



Race and Ethnicity:

Click here for more information about the data.

* Demographics for negative tests were updated on 05/28/2020 and were calculated based on laboratory reports that have race/ethnicity data available. Not all negative tests have demographic data available and should not be interpreted as a count of negative tests.

 

 

COVID-19 Cases, Hospitalizations and Deaths in Knox County

Click here for more information about the data.
* Hospitalizations, Cases and Deaths may not add up to the daily reported number of cases for race and ethnicity. Rates can not be calculated for individuals with unknown race or ethnicity.
* Population estimates updated from 2018 to 2019 values
** Total includes probable cases

COVID-19 Cumulative Case Counts per Day, including Growth Rate

 
 
Click here for more information about the data.
Data Source: National Electronic Disease Surveillance System Base System (NBS), hospital reporting, laboratory reporting.
* Growth rate is represented on the above graph. Scroll your mouse over each bar for data on previous cases, new cases, total cases and growth rate.

New Cases per Day with Trendline

 
 

Epidemiologic Curve by Illness Onset (N=)*

 
 
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* Data will be added as cases are interviewed and clear onset dates are established. In some cases, the onset date is the date the individual was tested. Not all cases have a clear onset date or have been interviewed.



Knox County Cases*
(Data is reported as of July 9, 2020).

* Some addresses have not yet been provided through the case investigation; therefore, they aren’t reflected in the map.

0-5
6-24
25-44
45-64
65-84
85-144
145-204

* Map will be updated every Friday


Benchmarks for Reopening Process

(Data is updated as of )

As we locally advance through reopening, we anticipate an increase in active cases at each phase due to the low number of initial active cases. The focus of the benchmarks outlined here is on assessing the local ability to manage an increase in cases while preventing the unobstructed growth of transmission. Our low initial active case counts will likely mean we will not obtain a downward trend throughout the reopening process. Our community demonstrated success in flattening the curve before it truly started. Due to this initial success, further advancement in reopening will result in increased numbers of active case counts. This alone is not a reason to revert to more restrictive reopening guidance or not advance in the reopening process.

Decisions about how to move through reopening will be made the Knox County Board of Health and not based on any one number or figure.

To more visually represent how the benchmarks are being attained, a traffic light is being utilized to depict the status of each benchmark.

Red signifies the trends are not moving towards benchmark attainment and may indicate adjustments need to be made.

Yellow signifies the trends are moving towards/away from reaching benchmark attainment. Yellow indicates caution.

Green signifies that the benchmark is currently met.

As new challenges and opportunities arise, it may be appropriate for the Knox County Health Department and the Knox County Board of Health to consider additional benchmarks or to modify the current criteria.

This section of our data will be updated weekly.


1) Sustained reduction or stability in new cases for 14 days.
For more information about the benchmark, click here.

A sustained reduction or stability in new cases for 14 days is an indicator for movement towards the next phase. Although most cases occur within 5-7 days of exposure, almost all are evident by 14 days. Conversely, a statistically significant increase in new cases will require a full assessment of the current situation and other benchmarks. It may mean we need to make mid-phase adjustments or even mean we need to revert to an earlier phase of opening. Certain increases, such as a significant increase in new cases over the course of five days, would be a cause for thorough review. However, phase decisions should reflect a precise understanding of local trends.

  • Green: No three-day shifts of 1.5 standard deviations above a rolling mean (based on data from the previous 14 days)
  • Yellow: Three-day shifts detected above 1.5 but not greater than 3.0 standard deviations above a rolling mean (based on data from the previous 14 days)
  • Red: Three-day shifts detected above 3.0 standard deviations above a rolling mean (based on data from the previous 14 days)

COVID-19 Cumulative Case Counts per Day, including Growth Rate

 
 
Click here for more information about the data.
Data Source: National Electronic Disease Surveillance System Base System (NBS), hospital reporting, laboratory reporting.
* Growth rate is represented on the above graph. Scroll your mouse over each bar for data on previous cases, new cases, total cases and growth rate.

 

 

2) Community-wide sustained and increased diagnostic testing with consistent or decreased test result reporting turnaround time
For more information about the benchmark, click here.

For this benchmark, it is important that test results be available quickly, ideally within 24 hours so that COVID-positive people can isolate and KCHD can begin contact tracing to rapidly identify close contacts and those who should go into quarantine. However, given the current national laboratory processing capacity, consideration should be given to reporting timeframes that do not exceed the current five-day average. Additionally, in an effort to contain the spread of the virus, KCHD will prioritize rapid contract tracing for probable cases who are waiting on lab results to quickly quarantine their contacts, which reduces the risk of ongoing community transmission.

  • Green: Sustained or increased diagnostic testing and sustained or decreased test result reporting turnaround time
  • Yellow: Three-day negative shift detected between 1.5 but no greater than 3.0 standard deviations below a rolling mean (based on data from the previous 14 days) and result reporting turnaround time exceeds weekly average testing report time
  • Red: Three-day negative shift detected more than 3.0 standard deviations below the rolling mean (based on data from the previous 14 days) and result reporting turnaround time exceeds weekly average testing report time

Tests Conducted for Knox County Residents

*We understand the reporting system (NBS) is likely experiencing a delay statewide in recording negative tests, therefore the data is demonstrating lower numbers than what was actually conducted for this time period. To be clear, there is not a delay in reporting positive cases.

* * *
Click here for more information about the data.
* These numbers do not represent all of the testing being performed on Knox County residents. This information is pulled from National Electronic Disease Surveillance System Base System (NBS), and includes only those reports for which a Knox County address is provided. As we previously stated, not all negative labs have an associated address in the system. This information should be interpreted as a sample of testing in the community being provided by public health, hospitals and other medical providers. An upward trend in the number of tests in this system can be interpreted as an upward trend in broader testing across the community.
* 04/25/2020 drive through testing event

Average Time (Days) between Specimen Collection and Lab Report Data (Positive Tests)

Click here for more information about the data.
* This information is based average time between specimen collection and lab report date for Knox County confirmed cases.
Average Lag Time since April 1, 2020: 3.21 Days
Average Lag Time since May 1, 2020: 3.26 Days

 

 

3) Sustained or increased public health capability
For more information about the benchmark, click here.

Health departments need resources to conduct rapid and effective investigations and monitor cases and contacts effectively. Estimates of personnel needs for these tasks range from 4 to 15 per 100,000 population. That translates to approximately 16-75 investigators for Knox County, along with additional personnel to monitor cases and contacts, enter data, and provide data analysis, which would be a total of approximately 100-120 people for the County. KCHD will track efforts to reach new cases (who need isolation) and contacts (who need to quarantine). KCHD will also document the ability to initiate investigations of all new cases within 24 hours of notification and initiate contact tracing within 48 hours. Cases will be monitored daily.

  • Green: Initiate investigations for 97 to 100 percent of new cases within 24 hours from KCHD receiving notification of the case, and contact tracing is initiated within 48 hours for 97 to 100 percent of close contacts
  • Yellow: Initiate investigations for 95 to 96.9 percent of new cases within 24 hours from KCHD receiving notification of the case, and contact tracing is initiated within 48 hours for 95 to 96.9 percent of close contacts
  • Red: Initiate investigations for less than 95 percent of new cases within 24 hours from KCHD receiving notification of the case, and contact tracing is initiated within 48 hours for less than 95 percent of close contacts


Contact Tracing Response Time

Cases: 100% of new case investigations have been initiated within 24 hours of notification, since March 16, 2020

Close Contacts: 100% of close contact investigations have been initiated within 48 hours of notification, since March 16, 2020

 

 

Public Health Capacity

For more information, click here.

The following table provides additional information on public health capacity for the community’s information. KCHD consistently trains and operates under a Public Health Investigation Team (PHIT) model. We have a core team that responds to outbreaks regularly. This team can expand beyond the core team to accommodate outbreaks of greater scale. With an average of 12 outbreaks a year, this team is ready to respond and requires little training in interviewing, contact investigation or contact monitoring. Beyond the PHIT teams, other KCHD staff have been identified to respond in this capacity if needed. That said, given the scale of the pandemic, KCHD anticipates employers and medical facilities also will be asked to assist with contact tracing and monitoring for the benefit of the public. Cases and contacts will be provided instructions on how to protect themselves and others while in isolation and quarantine.


Currently Designated Epidemiology Support Team: 138
Click here for more information about the data.
* Epidemiology Support Team Members may assist with case investigation, contact tracing, monitoring, data input, and data analysis.
* It is important to note that the number of Currently Designated Epidemiology Team Members is based on case load and is sufficient to handle the current volume of existing and new cases. Our teams are designed to be expanded as needs arise. The upper benchmark estimate of 100-120 personnel is not required at this time.

KCHD is working to restore some of the traditional services that were temporarily suspended so staff could focus on the response, per our continuity of operations plan. This means that we are working to retool how we staff our Epidemiology Support Teams. To support these efforts, we are also working with the Tennessee Department of Health on staffing alternatives to provide services for the response. More information is forthcoming on the local contact tracing capacity beyond the core Epidemiology Support Team. That said, the current team is still able to contact cases and close contacts within the ideal timeline of this benchmark.

 

 

4) Health care system capabilities remain within current and forecasted surge capacity.
For more information about the benchmark, click here.

The Knox County Health Department will track and share information about the availability of regional hospital beds, ICU beds, ventilators, and confidence in supplies to ensure that they are adequately available if cases surge. State and federal stockpiles should be used to fill in deficiencies, when possible. Additionally, the hospitals, given their full perspective on bed availability, staffing, resources, and supplies, will be working with us to assess their health care system capacity benchmark.

  • Green: No three-day shifts of 1.5 standard deviations above a rolling mean (based on data from the previous 14 days)
  • Yellow: Three-day shifts detected above 1.5 but not greater than 3.0 standard deviations above a rolling mean (based on data from the previous 14 days)
  • Red: Three-day shifts detected above 3.0 standard deviations above a rolling mean (based on data from the previous 14 days)
Acute Care Hospitals in Knox County/East Region

East TN Children’s Hospital
Fort Sanders Regional Medical Center
Parkwest Medical Center
Turkey Creek Medical Center
North Knoxville Medical Center
University of TN Medical Center
Big South Fork Medical Center
Blount Memorial Hospital
Claiborne Medical Center
Jefferson Memorial Hospital

Jellico Medical Center
LaFollette Medical Center
LeConte Medical Center
Fort Loudon Medical Center
Methodist Medical Center
Morristown-Hamblen Medical Center
Newport Hospital
Roane Medical Center
Sweetwater Hospital

COVID-19 Positive Regional Hospital Inpatients (hospitalized), ICU, and Ventilators

 
 
Click here for more information about the data.
* Regional hospital data is gathered from the information hospitals put into the Tennessee Healthcare Resource Tracking System (HRTS). This information may reflect Knox County, East Region or patients from other jurisdictions. This data will be reported weekly. All 19 hospitals in the Knox and East Tennessee region (16 counties) participate in HRTS. As with all data of this kind, it is meant to portray the information for a specific moment of time for the hospitals and is dependent on the participating hospitals to report the information. Consequently, there may be a difference in the number of hospitalizations public health reports daily for Knox County cases versus what is visible on the regional level in these graphics. When discrepancies exist, utilize the daily reported data.

Pending COVID-19 Labs for Regional Hospital Inpatients (hospitalized), ICU, and Ventilator

 
 
Current as of
Click here for more information about the data.
* Total capacity = Regional hospital standard capacity as reported in the Healthcare Resource Tracking System.

 

 

Click here for more information about the data.
* Additional Surge Capacity = Data gathered through the Alternate Care Site and Medical Surge Task Force and represents potential hospital capacity over and above the total capacity in the first table. Data on this table will not change from week to week.
* This data is collected from the Tennessee Healthcare Resource Tracking System (HRTS) and represents the inpatient information for all the hospitals in Knox and the surrounding 16 counties. All 19 hospitals in the Knox and East Tennessee region (16 counties) input data into HRTS. This information may reflect Knox County, East Region or patients from other jurisdictions. This data will be reported weekly. As with all data of this kind, it is meant to portray the information at a specific moment in time for the hospitals and is dependent on the participating hospitals to report the information. Consequently, there may be a difference in the number of hospitalizations public health reports daily for Knox County cases versus what is visible on the regional level in these graphics. When discrepancies exist, utilize the daily reported data.

 

 

5) Sustained or decreased COVID-19 related death rate for identified positive or probable cases.
For more information about the benchmark, click here.

A significant increase in COVID-related deaths will require a full assessment of the current situation and other benchmarks. It may mean we need to make mid-phase adjustments (such as re-imposing stricter physical distancing guidelines) or even mean we need to revert to an earlier phase of opening. However, phase decisions should reflect a precise understanding of local trends. If, for instance, the Knox County Health Department identifies a cluster that results in a spike in fatalities, movement towards greater reopening could continue, even with an increase in deaths. This illustrates the critical importance of public health investigation efforts.

  • Green: Sustained or decreased case fatality rate for identified positive or probably cases.
  • Yellow: Increased case fatality rate by 1.0%-2.0% over a 14-day period for identified positive or probable cases
  • Red: Increased case fatality rate above 2.0% over a 14-day period for identified positive or probable cases
  • * In development: Given the low frequency of COVID-related mortality locally, the metrics for this benchmark may be adapted if the COVID-19 related deaths increase.

 

 

COVID-19 Cases, Hospitalizations and Deaths in Knox County

Click here for more information about the data.
* Hospitalizations, Cases and Deaths may not add up to the daily reported number of cases for race and ethnicity. Rates can not be calculated for individuals with unknown race or ethnicity.
* Population estimates updated from 2018 to 2019 values
** Total includes probable cases
* Data is updated daily.